A century ago, in 1917, bard William Butler Yeats purchased a 15th-century Norman tower in the Irish countryside as a summer home. “I shall make it habitable … It is certainly a beautiful place,” he informed his father.

For Yeats, Thoor Ballylee was “a place full of history and romance” that inspired some of his later masterful works, including “The Tower” and “The Winding Stair.” While today the abode—which has been prone to winter flooding due to its riverside location—is mostly devoid of decorations or furnishings, there is atmosphere aplenty in the four-story structure with a stone staircase winding through the tower and leading to a roof platform.

Thoor Ballylee is located in County Galway and best reached by car. For an off-the-beaten-path location, the tower sees plenty of activity. On the day I visited last summer, a local television station was filming a travel segment, and recent visitors had included the novelist Colum McCann and former U.S. Senator Chris Dodd.

In the now-restored dining room, the Yeats family would fish out the window, which opens above the Streamstown River.

Visitors can explore the tower at their leisure and also peruse some illustrated exhibits that shed light on Yeats’ personal and professional lives. One exhibit is devoted to the women who greatly influenced the wordsmith—like his wife, George Hyde-Lees, who feigned episodes of spirit-guided writing to prompt his poetry, and Maude Gonne, the unrequited love of his life.

Thoor Ballylee is open during the summer months and well worth a stop when literary traveling on the Emerald Isle.