You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Travel’ category.

nhs-longfellow-house

Where better to read Robert Frost’s “Mending Wall” than in the setting that inspired the author to put pen to paper. Or stand in the cozy study in the house (pictured above) where Henry Wadsworth Longfellow conjured “Paul Revere’s Ride” and “The Song of Hiawatha.” Whether it’s to learn about a slice of American history, gain insight into the artistic process, or simply to appreciate the power and beauty of great verse, here are eight places to celebrate American poets (along with a few bonus literary locales).

Emily Dickinson Museum, Amherst, Massachusetts
During her lifetime, Emily Dickinson penned some 1,800 poems spanning a wide range of subjects, from spirituality and nature to art and medicine, among them “Because I could not stop for death” and “Success is counted sweetest.” Only a few of her poems were published during her lifetime, while others she shared with family and friends. Much of Dickinson’s verse was penned in secret, recorded in small, handmade booklets discovered after her death. Along with guided tours of two Dickinson family homes, visitors can stroll the grounds where the green-thumbed poet once gardened in her signature white dress (a replica of which is on display in her bedroom). Open March through December.

Robert Frost Farm, Derry, New Hampshire
“To a large extent, the terrain of my poetry is the Derry land­scape,” Robert Frost told a friend. “There was something about the experience at Derry which stayed in my mind, and was tapped for poetry in the years that came after.” Visitors can tour the white clapboard farmhouse, a gift to the newly wed Frost from his grandfather at the turn of the 19th century, where he penned verse late at night in the kitchen cozied up to a wood stove. While hiking a nature trail on the property, keep an out for two particularly notable sites: the stone-wall boundaries evoked in Frost’s poem “Mending Wall” and the stream he immortalized in “Hyla Brook.” Open May through October.

Following Frost: The poet is also commemorated at Frost Place in Franconia, New Hampshire, a farm with views of the White Mountains, where he settled after returning from a stint living in Europe. In Shaftsbury, Vermont, is the Robert Frost Stone House Museum, a hilltop cottage where resided for nearly a decade, and in nearby Ripton is the Robert Frost Interpretive Trail, a one-mile wooded hiking loop annotated with excerpts from his poetry.

Read the rest of this entry »

Bibliophiles, get ready for a road trip. Summer is the perfect time to visit author houses and other literary landmarks. Some are only open seasonally this time of year, while others offer special events and activities—yoga, live music, improv, and more.

Do Yoga at Scott and Zelda’s Place

FitzgeraldMuseum.JPGGet zen at the Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald Museum in Montgomery, Alabama. Before hitting the mat for a fundraising yoga class, tour the only museum dedicated to the Jazz Age pair. They lived in this house in the city’s historic district for several months in 1931, Scott toiling over Tender is the Night and Zelda writing the novel Save Me the Waltz. Yoga @ The Fitzgerald Museum takes place on Saturday, June 17 from 4:30-6 p.m. and costs $10.

Read the rest of this entry »

“I still cherish the dream of returning for another revel in dear, dirty, delightful London, for I enjoyed myself there more than any where else,” wrote Louisa May Alcott in an 1868 letter to the friend who had shown her around Dickensian London.

Visiting the homes and haunts of famous writers is a time-honored tradition—one that intrigued some of the very authors whose own houses are now popular destinations for literary travelers.

After the publication of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women in 1868, fans of the book began trekking to Concord, Massachusetts, where the boldest ones knocked on the door of Orchard House, the Alcott family abode, looking for the author. Publicity-shy Louisa sometimes pretended to be a servant to deflect the attention, but she probably understood their curiosity. During a trip to London three years earlier, she visited sites featured in Charles Dickens’ tales. She revealed in her diary, “I felt as if I’d got into a novel while going about in the places I’d read so much of.”

Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, a destination for early literary travelers.

Read the rest of this entry »

After Agatha Christie tied the knot with archaeologist Max Mallowan at an Edinburgh cathedral in 1930, they set out on an adventuresome journey. “Max had planned the honeymoon entirely himself; it was going to be a surprise,” Christie penned in An Autobiography.

Romantic Venice was the first stop for the newly wed crime writer. Christie had passed through the Italian city previously while traveling on the Orient Express from London to the Middle East, where she met her future husband on an archaeological dig.

“I resolved…that if ever I am so fortunate I shall spend my honeymoon here!” Max Mallowan once vowed about Venice. And indeed he did.

Read the rest of this entry »

novel-destinations-second-edition-cover writersF

Enter your email address to follow Novel Destinations and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Instagram @NovelDestinations

“Ford followed him through the central hall of the Library to the East Room, whose walls were covered with bookshelves. There were two upper tiers with promenades of frosted glass and polished brass balustrades so that any book could be easily removed from its place no matter how high. Morgan walked up to the far wall, pressed the spine of a certain book, and part of the shelving swung away to reveal a passageway through which a man could pass.” ... I changed the order of the five NYC-set novels I added to my TBR, delving into Ragtime first. A guest I had in town wanted to visit the Morgan Library, which is a setting for a scene in the story, so it seemed only fitting to start with this one. The story is an homage to NYC, an intriguing blend of fictional characters and real people, set in the tumultuous years leading up to World War I and told in a style that is both dreamlike and gritty. I’m a little more than halfway through, and I already know I’m going to be reluctant to finish because I won’t want it to end. ... #nyc #nycreads #morganlibrary #ragtime #eldoctorow #literarylandmarks #noveldestinations #booksofig #igreads #classicbooks #bookstagram #book @themorganlibrary
I love browsing at the library with no specific titles in mind, just seeing what catches my eye. Like these three novels, all of which I’m excited to read. But I may have been a bit overzealous because first I need to finish the three other books I have going right now. #readingresponsibilities #booksbooksbooks #milkman #annaburns #theparagonhotel #lyndsayfaye #unmarriageable #soniahkamal #bookstack #bookstagram #booksofig #igreads #bookwormproblems #library #librarybooks #hobokenlibrary @hobokenlibrary #springreads @graywolfpress @penguinrandomhouse @putnambooks @lyndsayfaye @soniahkamal
I borrowed The House of Mirth from the library to use in the book stack in my last post, and I couldn’t resist re-reading it. It’s one of my favorite Edith Wharton works, along with Glimpses of the Moon. ... Wharton wrote The House of Mirth, the novel that launched her into literary superstardom, in an upstairs bedroom suite overlooking the gardens at The Mount, her estate in the Berkshire Mountains in Lenox, Massachusetts. In addition to crafting Gilded Age fiction, Wharton had a talent for architecture and landscape design. She designed The Mount’s three-story, 42-room mansion (see next pic) and elaborate French- and Italianate-style gardens. Wharton told a friend, “Decidedly, I’m a better landscape gardener than a novelist, and this place, every line of which is my own work, far surpasses The House of Mirth.” ... #thehouseofmirth #edithwharton #themount #lenoxmass #noveldestinations #classics #literarytravel #books #springreading #bookstagram #booksofig #igreads @themountlenox

Follow Shannon on Twitter

%d bloggers like this: