You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Bronte country’ tag.

1243_largePrecious relics of the life of Charlotte Brontë are taking center stage this year in a pair of special exhibitions celebrating the author’s bicentenary.

At the Brontë Parsonage Museum in Haworth, Charlotte Great and Small, curated by acclaimed novelist and Brontë enthusiast Tracy Chevalier, explores the contrast between Charlotte Brontë’s constricted life and her huge ambition. Growing up in the Haworth parsonage, Charlotte and her sisters lived in confined spaces, shared beds and worked together in one room. Despite being so contained, she had big ideas and longed to become “forever known”.

1183_largeExhibition highlights include Charlotte’s child-size clothes, several of the tiny books the Brontës wrote as children, and a scrap from a dress Charlotte wore to an important London dinner party. Another intriguing item on display is a moving love letter Charlotte wrote to her Belgian teacher, Constantin Heger, loaned by the British Library.

Additional objects from the Parsonage feature in the National Portrait Gallery’s Celebrating Charlotte Brontë, which transfers to New York’s Morgan Library this fall. The exhibition explores the story behind the only surviving portrait of Charlotte, Emily and Anne, painted by their brother Branwell. The painted was discovered folded on top of a wardrobe and subsequent acquired and restored by the Gallery in 1914.

 

 

Recently, I had the opportunity to write a “Behind the Book” story for BookPage about some of the adventures Shannon and I had while on the road researching Novel Destinations. Our very first literary trip together was undertaken nearly three years ago, shortly after I arrived here in England from New York City. Both of us had been itching to get to Brontë Country in the Yorkshire Moors, which is one of the most atmospheric places in England and of course, the brooding locale that inspired one of our favorite books, Wuthering Heights. We were not disappointed!

The tiny, picturesque village of Haworth where the three talented Brontë sisters lived much of their short lives is full of literary treasures, from the Brontë Parsonage Museum, to the church where many of the Brontës were laid to rest, to the moors themselves, where the sisters found much inspiration. We spent lots of time at the Black Bull pub (pictured), where the sisters’ wayward brother, Branwell, whiled away many hours before his untimely death. — Joni Rendon

novel-destinations-second-edition-cover writersF

Enter your email address to follow Novel Destinations and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Instagram @NovelDestinations

The only good thing about being sick is the extra time to read. Thrillers and other gripping, fast-paced stories are a necessary remedy for making it through a wicked head cold. At the rate I’ve been going through books, I’m grateful to have access to my library’s offerings with the #libbyapp for an immediate and seemingly endless supply. I recommend all of these reads, in sickness and in health. I especially liked #Transcription by #KateAtkinson about a young woman recruited by MI5 in London during World War II and #LoveandRuin by #PaulaMcLain about Martha Gellhorn, a celebrated war journalist and Hemingway’s third spouse (the only one of his wives to leave him). #greatstorytelling #thankgoodnessfornovels #bookstagram #igbooks #theflightattendant #thedeathofmrswestaway #intothewater #librarylove
This was my book club’s most recent read, selected by me. I always find it a bit nerve-wracking when it’s my turn to choose, and I start making a list of possibilities several months in advance and narrow it down from there. I’m happy to report that LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE made for an interesting, in-depth discussion, largely because of the gray areas in the story. The complexity of human behavior and motivations, parent-children dynamics, taking sides, keeping secrets, making tough decisions, disguising manipulation and dishonesty as altruism. And how much responsibility a person bears when they compel someone, either intentionally or unintentionally, into a destructive course of action—igniting little fires everywhere. #greatstorytelling #discussionworthy #bookclubpick #bookstagram #booksofig #littlefireseverywhere #celesteng
From sunshine reading to snowstorm reading, in the span of a day. #welcomehome #snowstorm #books #reading #imissmiami

Follow Shannon on Twitter

%d bloggers like this: