You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Chatsworth House’ tag.

If seeing the film adaptation of Charlotte Brontë’s Gothic novel Jane Eyre, which opened in theaters last Friday, has inspired wanderlust, head for Haddon Hall (below left) in the English countryside. Located in Bakewell, Derbyshire, the stand-in for Mr. Rochester’s atmospheric Thornfield Hall is a fortified medieval manor house and one of the oldest dwellings in England.

Some scenes were also shot in the gardens at Chatsworth House (below right)—home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire—which has appeared on film before. It was used for the exterior shots of Mr. Darcy’s house, Pemberley, in the 2005 movie Pride and Prejudice starring Keira Knightley and Matthew Macfadyen. 

Combine a visit to Haddon Hall and Chatsworth House with a trip to the village of Haworth in Yorkshire, the longtime home of Charlotte and her famous sisters, Emily and Anne. Visit the Brontë Parsonage Museum, housed in the siblings’ former abode; take a literary-themed walking tour of the town; and have a pint or two at the Black Bull, a pub their wayward brother Branwell frequented.

One of the most memorable things Joni and I did on our trip to Haworth was amble along the moors to the Brontë sisters’ favorite destination. The picturesque spot has a waterfall and what has been dubbed the “Brontë chair,” which is a stone slab in the shape of a (surprisingly comfortable) chair. It’s a great place to take a breather after the two-and-a-half mile hike to get there.

The Focus Features website has a ton of fascinating information about the making of the film. Also of note: Austenprose.com has a review of the movie by Syrie James, whose novels include The Secret Diaries of Charlotte Brontë and The Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen. –Shannon McKenna Schmidt

[Photos: Haddon Hall, ©flickr/roger 4336; all others, ©NovelDestinations.com]

novel-destinations-second-edition-cover writersF

Enter your email address to follow Novel Destinations and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Instagram @NovelDestinations

I love browsing at the library with no specific titles in mind, just seeing what catches my eye. Like these three novels, all of which I’m excited to read. But I may have been a bit overzealous because first I need to finish the three other books I have going right now. #readingresponsibilities #booksbooksbooks #milkman #annaburns #theparagonhotel #lyndsayfaye #unmarriageable #soniahkamal #bookstack #bookstagram #booksofig #igreads #bookwormproblems #library #librarybooks #hobokenlibrary @hobokenlibrary #springreads @graywolfpress @penguinrandomhouse @putnambooks @lyndsayfaye @soniahkamal
I borrowed The House of Mirth from the library to use in the book stack in my last post, and I couldn’t resist re-reading it. It’s one of my favorite Edith Wharton works, along with Glimpses of the Moon. ... Wharton wrote The House of Mirth, the novel that launched her into literary superstardom, in an upstairs bedroom suite overlooking the gardens at The Mount, her estate in the Berkshire Mountains in Lenox, Massachusetts. In addition to crafting Gilded Age fiction, Wharton had a talent for architecture and landscape design. She designed The Mount’s three-story, 42-room mansion (see next pic) and elaborate French- and Italianate-style gardens. Wharton told a friend, “Decidedly, I’m a better landscape gardener than a novelist, and this place, every line of which is my own work, far surpasses The House of Mirth.” ... #thehouseofmirth #edithwharton #themount #lenoxmass #noveldestinations #classics #literarytravel #books #springreading #bookstagram #booksofig #igreads @themountlenox
These are some of the titles I talked about during a conversation on literary travel with @thebooktrail. Some relate to favorite destinations, like St. Malo, the coastal French town used as a setting in Anthony Doerr’s World War II-set novel All the Light We Cannot See, while another ties in to a place that’s high on my literary travel bucket list: Samoa, the South Seas island where Robert Louis Stevenson spent his last years, vividly depicted in Nancy Horan’s Under the Wide and Starry Sky. The novel follows the globetrotting writer and his wife, Fanny Osbourne, during a life of romance and adventure. Q&A is in the site’s “Authors on Location” section. #noveldestinations #literarytravel #books #bookstagram #booksofig #igreads #bookpile #allthelightwecannotsee #underthewideandstarrysky #thelastcastle #thehouseofmirth #ngaiomarsh #authorsofinstagram #thebooktrail

Follow Shannon on Twitter

%d bloggers like this: