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Ernest Hemingway was born in July on the cusp of the 20th century, and the summer month would prove to be a pivotal time for the writer throughout his life. Here are some key July moments in the Hemingway timeline:

July 21, 1899 – Hemingway made his debut in Oak Park, Illinois, a middle-class Chicago suburb where he spent the first 18 years of his life. He
spent his early childhood years in a grand turreted, Queen Anne-style home, now the Ernest Hemingway Birthplace Museum.

July 1918 – While driving an ambulance for the Red Cross on the Italian front lines during World War I, 18-year-old Hemingway was seriously
wounded by mortar fire. His shrapnel wounds were tended to by a nurse, Agnes von Kurowsky, with whom he fell in love. Their relationship inspired his novel about a doomed wartime romance, A Farewell to Arms.

July 1923 – The insatiable traveler attended his first bullfight during Pamplona’s legendary running of the bulls, returning nearly every year for the rest of the decade to witness the death-defying spectacle. His Spanish sojourns inspired his 1925 novel The Sun Also Rises, which takes place during the annual Fiesta of San Fermin and follows a dissolute band of expats who spend their days drinking brandy and absinthe at Café Iruna. (A statue of Hemingway at the bar at Café Iruña is in the photo above.)

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Hemingway House

Or there will be soon. The Ernest Hemingway Home & Museum in Key West is developing an app that allows users virtual access to the property.

The sun-drenched island was supposed to be a brief stopover for Hemingway after he left Paris in 1928. Instead he found himself drawn to Key West’s rough-and-tumble charm, and it became his first home on U.S. soil after spending most of his adult life abroad. Three years later he moved into a two-story Spanish colonial-style house, today the Ernest Hemingway Home & Museum.

It’s one of our favorite literary sites, a delight for both bibliophiles and cat lovers. The museum’s app offers details about Hemingway’s days in Key West and an overview of his books, poems, and short stories. It also has a tour through the grounds, the house, and the studio where the writer penned his semi-autobiographical novel A Farewell to Arms and other works.

Marlene Deitrich

The best part: the app introduces Marlene Dietrich (in the photo above hanging out in Hemingway’s bedroom) and the other cats who have the run of the place. Legend has it that a ship’s captain once gave Hemingway a six-toed cat, and the 50 or so felines that live on the property today are its descendants.

The app is available in eight languages. You can sign up on the museum’s website if you’d like to receive an email notification when it’s released.

Novel Destinations features a chapter about Ernest Hemingway’s days in Key West in the 1930s, which Joni researched and wrote. After reading her descriptions of Hemingway’s haunts on the island, I was inspired to visit and recently had the chance to do so. On the plane ride there from New York I read Hemingway’s To Have and Have Not, which uses Key West and Cuba as its backdrops, and is his only novel set in the U.S.

The highlight in Key West was the Ernest Hemingway Home and Museum, a two-story Spanish colonial-style house at 907 Whitehead Street. The rough-and-tumble charm of the U.S.’s southernmost city appealed to the writer, and it became his first home on U.S. soil after spending most of his adult life abroad. Located behind the house is Hemingway’s writing studio, where he worked on his semi-autobiographical novel A Farewell to Arms and other works.

The literary connection was enough to lure me to the Hemingway Home, but there was also another draw: the 50 or so cats that live on the property. Legend has it that a ship’s captain gave Hemingway a six-toed cat and the ones that live there today are its descendants. The cats have the run of the gorgeous grounds and the house, and the orange-colored Archibald even sleeps in Hemingway’s bed. That’s Archibald in the photo on the right at the cats’ drinking fountain; the bottom portion of the fountain is a urinal from a bar Hemingway frequented, Sloppy Joe’s.

Speaking of Sloppy Joe’s, my husband and I paid two visits to the raucous bar that has Hemingway’s photo and other memorabilia scattered throughout the place. I sampled the Papa Dobles, a cocktail invented for Hemingway and named for him. (If you’re flying in at night, the red neon “Sloppy Joe’s” sign is visible from the air.)

On the dining front, there was Blue Heaven (right), which serves up Caribbean-inspired food and has live music. Before the space was a restaurant, the courtyard that now serves as the dining area was the site of boxing matches occasionally refereed by Hemingway. Another restaurant recommendation is Santiago’s Bodega. Sadly there is no literary connection, but the tapas are excellent.

Look for Part 2 on my Key West adventures — and information about another famous literary figure who spent time on the island — next week…

–Shannon McKenna Schmidt

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#WanderlustWednesday A conversation earlier this week with @shapedbystoriesdiane about our literary travel bucket lists has my wanderlust going wild. As much as I dream of making it to a far-flung locale like Guernsey for a tour of Victor Hugo’s house or to Samoa to see Robert Louis Stevenson’s last abode, this year my exploring will be closer to home. A day trip to revisit Washington Irving’s lovely estate, Sunnyside, overlooking the Hudson River in Tarryrown, NY, and hopefully a weekend excursion to the intriguing Emily Dickinson Museum in Amherst, MA (finally!). And perhaps a trip to Chicago for the American Writers Museum and Hemingway’s birthplace in nearby Oak Park. What literary locales will you be exploring this year? And if not in person then on the page. #noveldestinations #literarytravel #booksandtravel #travelguide #travelguides #bookstagram #wanderlust #instabooks #igreads #travel @emilydickinson.museum @washingtonirvingsunnyside @americanwritersmuseum #guidebook #travelguidebook #travelgram #passport #booksbooksbooks
Seeing the terrific new movie adaptation of LITTLE WOMEN has me thinking about a road trip to revisit sites related to the story. Surprisingly, this is the first screen version of Louisa May Alcott’s tale to use Massachusetts, her lifelong home, as a primary filming location. “To shoot in Concord, in Massachusetts, in this area, in this environment, was really essential in how I wanted to build this movie,” explained director Greta Gerwig in an interview. “It’s significant. The place matters as much as anything.” ... The Alcott family home and also the most significant locale in the lives of the March sisters, Orchard House, was temporarily recreated on a property in Concord. Louisa May Alcott drew so heavily on real-life details, like the trunk of costumes the March sisters used to stage their plays, that visiting the actual abode is a true delight for fans. Of all the literary locales I’ve visited, this is the place where I most felt like I had stepped into a novel. ... #noveldestinations #travelguide #littlewomen #littlewomenmovie #louisamayalcott #orchardhouse #literarytravel #literarylandmarks #classicliterature #concordma #bookstagram
If I had selected a 7th top title of 2019, it would have been this one. Which surprises me. I didn’t feel as if I completely connected with the story while reading it, but it’s one that I think about a lot—what draws us to romantic partners and friends, especially ones who seemingly are vastly different from us, and how our backgrounds influence the adults we become. I found particularly interesting the aspect of the storyline that deals with autism and the early days of diagnosis and treatment. Plus it’s primarily set in New York City, which is always a plus for me. #thedearlybeloved #booksofig #bookstagram #greatreads #igreads #booksandcocktails

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