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The literary lodging was one of the highlights during a road trip my husband and I recently took to Massachusetts and New Hampshire. The New England adventure began in Concord, Massachusetts, where we stayed at the charming Hawthorne Inn. We slept in the “Alcott Room” with a canopied bed, a bay window, and a view of The Wayside, the former home of Little Women author Louisa May Alcott and her family. (Nathaniel Hawthorne lived there in later years.)

Concord boasts an array of literary riches, including Orchard House, where Louisa May Alcott lived and set her famous tale about the March sisters; the Ralph Waldo Emerson Memorial House; and a replica of Henry David Thoreau’s cabin at Walden Pond. We enjoyed trekking around Walden Pond (at left) in the gorgeous weather, but by far the biggest surprise was the grounds of the Old Manse. The Old Manse was a farmhouse once owned by Emerson’s grandfather. The philosopher lived there for a time, as did a newly wed Nathaniel Hawthorne.

From the front it looks like an interesting but rather nondescript property. Once I rounded the side of the house, though, I was in for a surprise. A vast lawn slopes down to the Concord River, and there’s a great view of the North Bridge, where the first shots of the Revolutionary War were fired. (It was Pariots Day weekend, and the next morning we watched a battle re-enactment.) Even with the trees still bare, it was an impressive site. The grounds of the Old Manse adjoin Minuteman National Historical Park.

After leaving Concord we headed to Derry, NH, and were given a tour of the Robert Frost Farm (at left) by the wonderful Laura Burnham. Frost lived at the farm for more than a decade, and during that time he raised poultry and wrote poetry. Some of his most famous verse, including “Mending Wall,” was inspired by his time in Derry.

For our second night’s lodging, we stayed at Longfellow’s Wayside Inn in Sudbury, Massachusetts. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow used the establishment, which opened in 1716 as a tavern and lodging place, as the backdrop for his poetry collection Tales of a Wayside Inn. The Inn is a destination in itself and even has a walking tour brochure for exploring its sprawling acreage, which includes a working grist mill (at left), a one-room schoolhouse, wooded paths, a pond, and the not-yet-in-bloom Longfellow Rose Garden. The grand finale of our literary weekend was dining at the inn and then having a nightcap in the rustic Old Bar Room, one of the Wayside’s two orginal rooms. –Shannon McKenna Schmidt

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