You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘novel destinations louisa may alcott charles dickens nathaniel hawthorne classic authors edith wharton henry james’ tag.

“I still cherish the dream of returning for another revel in dear, dirty, delightful London, for I enjoyed myself there more than any where else,” wrote Louisa May Alcott in an 1868 letter to the friend who had shown her around Dickensian London.

Visiting the homes and haunts of famous writers is a time-honored tradition—one that intrigued some of the very authors whose own houses are now popular destinations for literary travelers.

After the publication of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women in 1868, fans of the book began trekking to Concord, Massachusetts, where the boldest ones knocked on the door of Orchard House, the Alcott family abode, looking for the author. Publicity-shy Louisa sometimes pretended to be a servant to deflect the attention, but she probably understood their curiosity. During a trip to London three years earlier, she visited sites featured in Charles Dickens’ tales. She revealed in her diary, “I felt as if I’d got into a novel while going about in the places I’d read so much of.”

Orchard House in Concord, Massachusetts, a destination for early literary travelers.

Read the rest of this entry »

novel-destinations-second-edition-cover writersF

Enter your email address to follow Novel Destinations and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Instagram @NovelDestinations

I love browsing at the library with no specific titles in mind, just seeing what catches my eye. Like these three novels, all of which I’m excited to read. But I may have been a bit overzealous because first I need to finish the three other books I have going right now. #readingresponsibilities #booksbooksbooks #milkman #annaburns #theparagonhotel #lyndsayfaye #unmarriageable #soniahkamal #bookstack #bookstagram #booksofig #igreads #bookwormproblems #library #librarybooks #hobokenlibrary @hobokenlibrary #springreads @graywolfpress @penguinrandomhouse @putnambooks @lyndsayfaye @soniahkamal
I borrowed The House of Mirth from the library to use in the book stack in my last post, and I couldn’t resist re-reading it. It’s one of my favorite Edith Wharton works, along with Glimpses of the Moon. ... Wharton wrote The House of Mirth, the novel that launched her into literary superstardom, in an upstairs bedroom suite overlooking the gardens at The Mount, her estate in the Berkshire Mountains in Lenox, Massachusetts. In addition to crafting Gilded Age fiction, Wharton had a talent for architecture and landscape design. She designed The Mount’s three-story, 42-room mansion (see next pic) and elaborate French- and Italianate-style gardens. Wharton told a friend, “Decidedly, I’m a better landscape gardener than a novelist, and this place, every line of which is my own work, far surpasses The House of Mirth.” ... #thehouseofmirth #edithwharton #themount #lenoxmass #noveldestinations #classics #literarytravel #books #springreading #bookstagram #booksofig #igreads @themountlenox
These are some of the titles I talked about during a conversation on literary travel with @thebooktrail. Some relate to favorite destinations, like St. Malo, the coastal French town used as a setting in Anthony Doerr’s World War II-set novel All the Light We Cannot See, while another ties in to a place that’s high on my literary travel bucket list: Samoa, the South Seas island where Robert Louis Stevenson spent his last years, vividly depicted in Nancy Horan’s Under the Wide and Starry Sky. The novel follows the globetrotting writer and his wife, Fanny Osbourne, during a life of romance and adventure. Q&A is in the site’s “Authors on Location” section. #noveldestinations #literarytravel #books #bookstagram #booksofig #igreads #bookpile #allthelightwecannotsee #underthewideandstarrysky #thelastcastle #thehouseofmirth #ngaiomarsh #authorsofinstagram #thebooktrail

Follow Shannon on Twitter

%d bloggers like this: