You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Shakespeare’ tag.

2ED5726F00000578-3335368-Archaeologists_have_uncovered_the_Bard_s_kitchen_at_New_Place_in-a-28_1448562670375

Almost 420 years since Shakespeare’s lavish and magnificent house, New Place, was razed to the ground, archaeologists have discovered what they believe to be the Bard’s demolished kitchen.

Uncovered in the remains of  Stratford-upon- Avon’s ‘New Place’, experts have found a well hearth and cold storage pit, which was used like a fridge to store cheese.

Historians are still trying to piece together clues of what Shakespeare’s impressive home would have been like and this discovery has been described as ‘vital’ to the effort.

The Bard bought New Place in 1597 and lived there for the last 19 years of his life, but it was destroyed by a subsequent owner in a fit of pique over land taxes.

In 2016–timed for the 400th anniversary of the Bard’s death–the re-imagined New Place will open as a heritage landmark.

This Saturday marks the start of England’s week long celebrations honoring Shakespeare, who would have turned 444 on April 23. Since I can’t make it out to Stratford this year, I hope to join one of this weekend’s Sonnet Walks in London, which highlight the Tudor history of the city in the accompaniment of twelve sonneteers.  

I’m also excited about the 2008 theatre season kicking off at the Globe with Wednesday’s performance of King Lear.  If you haven’t already got your hands on tickets to the season’s sold-out inaugural show, you can still join in the pre-performance birthday celebrations alongside the Thames, where a miniature Elizabethan theatre will be floating down the river before docking in front of the Globe.

But the ideal place to celebrate the bard’s birth is his Warwickshire birthplace of Stratford upon Avon, where an annual parade sets off next Saturday morning from his birthplace (pictured above) and culminates with the laying of floral tributes on the dramatist’s grave in Holy Trinity Church. Throughout the weekend, the town takes on the atmosphere of a lively Elizabethan carnival as musicians and members of “Shakespeare Live” stroll the streets performing scenes from the Bard’s repertoire.

Even if you can’t visit during the celebrations, Stratford is a must-see at any time of year because of its amazingly well-preserved Tudor architecture and its four Shakespeare-related properties. My favorite is Anne Hathaway’s cottage, an enchanting thatch-roofed dwelling surrounded by hollyhocks and climbing roses. It was in this fairytale setting where the bard wooed his future wife.

novel-destinations-second-edition-cover writersF

Enter your email address to follow Novel Destinations and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Instagram @NovelDestinations

My new favorite bookstore: Rough Draft in Kingston, NY, where the page-turners are plentiful and a stellar selection of craft beer and cider is on tap. Situated in a historic building with exposed brick and stone walls, Rough Draft has a welcoming vibe that invites people to linger, browsing the shelves, relaxing on one of the comfy couches, or having a drink and a chat at the bar. #dreamyplaces #roadtrip #hudsonvalley #bookstores #indiebookstore #booksandbeer #literarytravel #kingstonny #roughdraftbarandbooks @roughdraftny
“The Secret Garden was what Mary called it when she was thinking of it, and she liked still more the feeling that when its beautiful old walls shut her in no one knew where she was. It seemed almost like being shut out of the world in some fairy place.” 🌸 #bookclubpick Had fun revisiting a childhood favorite for this month’s selection. And now I desperately want a return trip to Yorkshire, where the story is set. #thesecretgarden #franceshodgsonburnett #bookclub #books #igreads #bookstagram #booksofig #readinggroup #classicliterature #booksofinstagram #bibliophile
💜 this novel. It’s fast-paced historical fiction, both comic and serious, with quirky, witty characters and terrifically vivid writing. Chapters alternate between the past, slowly revealing why, as the story opens, Alice “Nobody” James is on a train headed west, fleeing New York City in 1921 with a bullet wound and a suitcase full of cash, and the present, where she becomes embroiled in a mystery in Portland, Oregon. She hides out at the city’s only all-black hotel, the Paragon, where even with a knack for going unnoticed she stands out as the sole white woman on the premises. Meanwhile, the KKK has arrived in Portland, spreading violence and hate. When a child from the Paragon goes missing, Alice is determined to help her new friends find him, leading to disastrous consequences and the unraveling of long-held secrets. Paired with #EmpressGin. Although the story takes place during Prohibition, the cocktails flow behind closed doors. #theparagonhotel #lyndsayfaye #igreads #bookstagram #books #booklove #novels #pageturner #booksofinstagram #bibliophile

Follow Shannon on Twitter

%d bloggers like this: